Hi everyone! Here’s my second post on revision lessons I really, really like.

As you may have seen, I’m a little bit obsessed with circle based tasks. These mostly are not my ideas but I’m totally addicted to them now!

WHAT IS IT?

In its basic form, it’s a piece of A3 paper with three to four increasing circles (or if you fancy, pentagons), divided into as many sections as you need. Each of the layers represents something different (I.E. point, quotation, analysis, context)

HOW DO I USE IT?

How don’t you use it, you mean!

I use this template for:

  • Literally, metaphorically, symbolically analysis

  • Sentence upgrade tasks (change a word in each layer & highlight it)

  • Poetry comparison

  • Quotation revision

  • Essay planning (singularly & in pairs/groups)

  • Unseen poetry (fill the centre with quotes from unseen poems and let them interpret them outwards for maximum interpretive discussion).

Here are some photos of these guys in action:

 

 

 

WHY IS IT GOOD? Oh for so many reasons! Here’s a few:

  • They lend themselves naturally to student led, independent work.

  • It gives students freedom to explore their ideas within the confines of exam requirements.

  • They consistently reinforces the assessment objectives of your subject

  • You can fill bits in for them and hand out differentiated versions

  • Students can keep them and use them for essay planning and revision later on

  • Students can swap them and develop their own ideas

  • They’re perfect for visualising and producing live class paragraphs with

  • It allows them to go nuts with coloured pens

WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW BEFORE I DO THIS?

  • Modelling is king. The first few times I have an exemplar slide on the board displaying what I want them to do and we will do one together.

  • Print them out with one quadrant completed the first time, then the second time remove one layer and so on until you can give students an empty circle that they can confidently complete.

  • Let them work through their ideas in their own way. I can find this difficult; don’t deliberately ignore mistakes but let them navigate their own way through the task

WHAT NOW?
Give it a go! Here are a couple of examples in my Google Drive (they’ll be on the website soon)